Sea Beneath Enceladus – Saturn Icy Moon

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Just last month, there was a detection of Waves on Titan, Saturn’s largest moon. Now comes another updates that NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has detected signs of a sea beneath Enceladus, another Saturn moon, “furthering scientific interest in the moon as a potential home to extraterrestrial microbes”.

The findings were published in the journal Science on April 4.

Enceladus has a surface temperature of about minus 180 degrees Celsius, but under that surface there exists liquid water. Why is the liquid not frozen? A question that needs to be answered!

Space.com says the discovery “confirms suspicions many researchers have had about Enceladus since 2005, when NASA’s Cassini spacecraft first spotted ice and water vapor spewing from fractures near the moon’s south pole.”

The six-mile-deep ocean is hidden beneath Enceladus’ ice exterior, which may be as much as 19 to 25 miles thick and, according to NASA, makes Saturn’s icy moon one of the “most likely places in our solar system to host microbial life.”

Mars remains an intriguing candidate for life as evidence emerges that the red planet was once covered in water. It could have even had life before Earth did.

Now that water has been discovered in other plannetary bodies, does it mean they can support life?

Reference: Iscider.

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About Chris Ekong

Just a stubborn dude who always like to do what he knows how to do best. I don't like what is hot, I like what is cold and cool. Poet, fiction and non-fiction writer, writer, composer and a Coastal Geomorphologist.

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